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Town Hall #36 - Beyond Zero & New Possible - ASIA



Contributors:

Tegan Kajewski - Associate Interior Designer at LW

Stefan Krummeck - Principal at Farrells

Stephen Luk - Regional Vice President Design Services ASPAC, Head of Greater China at Hyatt Hotels Corporation

Julia Monk - Hospitality Thought Leader, Architect, Interior Designer

Ping Xu - Founder and Design Director at PH Alpha Design


Quotes:


Julia Monk

(On Joe Biden...) hopefully we're going to move from a stage of political diversity to political consensus, in order to help the world move ahead in a more smooth fashion
we have an awful lot of social injustice to overcome
as we solve all these things, and resolve all these things, new opportunities are going to open up to us that we can't even imagine at this point

Stefan Krummeck

sustainability starts at a different level, with much bigger picture thinking, city making thinking
sustainable thinking must start at a city planning level
if we can come up with more sustainable models and better public transport, we would make a big contribution to energy consumption and reducing the country's footprint

Mark Bergin

what we do when we actually set these huge goals is that we take forward some values
we make sure that we've made some decisions which we're going to be proud of in the future
government led directions are really important and they will really be able to move the needles
we all need to commit to Zero in 2050 and then we need to realise how far behind we are

Stephen Luk

from the corporate level, you know, we are taking some moves in terms of operation and design construction
we have a fairly low leverage on pushing for better environmental conscious construct options and waste management
it is so important to push it from a government level
China can be quite amazing in that way, when someone says something, they get it done
we never be truly able to predict what the future generations will be looking for in their traveling.

Tegan Kajewski

what we're still not seeing at the moment, is this idea of clients actually understanding that recycled materials can still be luxurious
I think it's about changing people's perceptions about what luxury is

Transcript:



Mark Bergin 00:02

Hello, everybody, welcome to another Design Executive Club Town Hall. I'm Mark Bergin, the Founder of DRIVENxDESIGN, and joining me is a panel of some of the smartest people I know in the Asian market. We're going to talk today about new possibilities and the provocation of what is BeyondZero. We know that most of the G20 countries except Australia, thank you to our Prime Minister, we'll be at net zero carbon emissions by 2050. Or in the case of China 2060. And that we're seeing that that's just a compliance schedule now. What are we doing beyond that? And what are the projects that could be enabled because we have more energy than we need to go use? Could we actually clean up some of the sins of the past? Could we enable some new technologies and new economic opportunities? Julie, I'm going to get you to join me here. And let's have a little conversation about the idea that it's not going to be a smooth path to go get there. There's probably some readiness things that we have to go look at. What do you think are some of the first things we need to get in order so that we can even imagine something as audacious as BeyondZero?


Tegan Kajawski 01:13

There are a few issues that are outstanding today. I mean, obviously, COVID is the immediate problem that we have, I think we need to deal with in order to move forward on many, many fronts. I think this is a reason why a lot of people are rushing to China right now, because they've domestically been able to get COVIC pretty much under control, and they've had an incredible repair to their own domestic and internal economies. So they're able to push forward in a more normal, what in the old fashion normal fashion that we're used to, and the rest of the world hasn't responded so well. Or in many cases, hasn't responded as well, in beening able to pull their economies back together. So I think that's kind of a very immediate issue that everyone's grappling with. And thank God for the vaccine. So I think the repair is going to happen on that front, much sooner than we'd all envisioned even six months ago. I think there's a lot of political divisiveness that needs to be tackled right now. We're seeing it all over the world. It's popping up in many, many different places. As an American, I'm very thrilled that Biden was finally made the official President Elect in the United States yesterday. I thought that was really brilliant, and about time. But even then, after that happens, there's an awful long way to go. And I think hopefully we're going to move from a stage of political diversity to political consensus, in order to help the world move ahead in a more smooth fashion. We've got all of our economy to deal with. I think that's a huge barrier in where we're going. And as you pointed out earlier, the whole idea of our media, particularly our social media, is really feeding I think both the political and economic side of those things. We also have an awful lot of social injustice to overcome and to heal, I think, which is another part of this divisiveness that's going on. So yeah, I think there's a lot of issues that we need to tackle along the way. And I have a hard time picturing what life will be like after 2050 simply because I think so much will happen over the next 30 years that it's going to just take us between technology and culture and social issues. I think as we solve all these things, and resolve all these things, new opportunities are going to open up to us that we can't even imagine at this point.


Mark Bergin 03:44

Yeah, and so I think you're right. It's very difficult to imagine what a 2050 or 2060 world will look like. But what we do when we actually set these huge goals is that we take forward some values, and we make sure that we've made some decisions which we're going to be proud of in the future rather than regretful. So I think of Stephen, with some of the Hyatt projects that you've got on, are you making decisions which are actually, from a selection of materials have been the most environmentally appropriate materials that you could have, from the amount of construction waste that's coming off a site? Have you done that in the best way? We can do that, but you've got to have that vision of what the future is, otherwise you just say we'll do whatever we want. So Steven, I wonder there for yourself with the Hyatt build out program that you've got, are there underlying, you know, future vision state values that are driving your decision making that they're helping, you know, the BeyondZero position? Or is it that it's more that there's a few people who hold those values or their corporate values?


Stephen Luk 04:58

Well from the corporate level, you know, we are taking some moves in terms of from operation and design construction. You know, we've been pushing the initiatives to reduce plastic bottles, you know, moving to large format amenities, putting in water station so that we no longer you know, put in plastic bottle water. With all those good initiatives that we are looking at, but they are just really a small part of the big picture, right. But if you look at the overall construction industry which is closer to what my department works on, you know, we have in some way a fairly low leverage on pushing for better environmental conscious construct options and waste management, you know. So all that really needs is the government, whether it's local or from a G20 standpoint, setting goals and setting directions and requiring them to follow the proper construction methods, you know, reducing waste and how to not be wasteful. And, you know, taking China as an example, you know, last couple of years, the government put out programs to not in the construction, but telling people to not to waste food. You know it was very common that when you go to China and you see people at a buffet restaurant which we run, and they would all go out and grab plates and plates of food and put in the middle to share that they never finished. So now the government, some local governments even fine them in a few of the large cities. They already have been implementing no more giving out a toothbrush and shaving cream and all that stuff in the room, you have to request that when you check in. So that is really to reduce ways for people hoarding those things, like stealing them and taking them home and in the end not using them. And so just reduci